Greetings from Middle Caye in Glover’s Reef Atoll!

Written by IBD Team WCS,  Banu Nagasundaram, Lindsay Zhang, Mark Parker, Maureen Klarich, and Pathak Pankaj

Glover's Reef Marine ReserveWe are Team WCS.  Our project this summer is to work in partnership with the Belize organization of the Wildlife Conservation Society to recommend effective management practices for Glover’s Reef Marine Reserve, a World Heritage site that also serves as one of the nine designated marine protected areas in Belize.  

During our five weeks at Berkeley, we began understanding marine protected areas and started navigating the complex network that involves marine protection management within Belize.  From fishermen to government to landowners to conservationists, there are many whose livelihoods are impacted by decisions made within these marine protected areas. Each week, we met with the WCS Belize management team from Berkeley to begin building relationships and ultimately the direction in which we would take this project.

Upon arriving to Belize City, we spent a day in the WCS Belize office before heading out to the Middle Caye island which is owned by WCS.  This was truly a once in a lifetime experience, exploring and understanding the realities of marine protection management 35 miles off the coast of Dangriga, Belize. 

Follow us for a day in the life of a Berkeley Haas IBD consultant on Glover’s Reef Marine Reserve:

6AM – 9AM

Sunrise Glover's Reef Marine Reserve

Early to bed, early to rise!  Along with the WCS and Belizean Fisheries and Coast Guard staff on the reserve, we started our days with the sun. Breakfast, delivered by the cooks Ms. Annette and Ms. Brenda, began promptly at 7AM.  Fried jacks (a Belizean specialty best described by our group as “fried dough”) and coffee were essential to the start of our day along with in-depth conversations with the WCS team and their visiting guests from the St. Louis Zoo. We spent a lot of time on the dock of Middle Caye, learning about the experiences of the WCS staff – many of whom have worked for and amongst the various stakeholders throughout their careers. What valuable conversations and a beautiful environment to hold these!

Dock at Glover's Reef Marine Reserve

9AM – 11AM

Taking in the nature of Belize. Along with the guests from St. Louis, we had the opportunity to explore the reserve each morning – learning about and understanding the marine ecosystem within the reserve and clearly understanding the need for conservation of this beautiful protected area. The team had the opportunity to partake in snorkeling the reef – a big shout out to our teammate, Banu, for diving right in and exploring the open seas for the first time!  She went from joining boat rides to swimming on her own in the reserve within four days.

11AM – 12PM

We took each morning to check in with the WCS Operations Manager, Ken. We really valued this time to talk through some of our observations and understand his perspective on the region. These sessions took place in the Research Lab where we were able to get a break from the strong sun.

12PM – 2PM

Ms. Annette and Ms. Brenda were back in action for lunch, hosting for over 40 guests – the WCS staff, the St Louis visiting guests, the Fisheries staff and Coast Guard staff on-site at Middle Caye, and ourselves.  Each meal gave us an opportunity to interact with stakeholders, learning their personal histories, their path to Glover’s Reef, and their thoughts and ideas surrounding conservation of this beautiful area.

2PM – 6PM

The afternoons were spent with more snorkeling and exploration of the Glover’s Reef atoll and the islands outside of Middle Caye.  Throughout the week, we had the opportunity to visit and meet with key stakeholders in the region who sit on the Advisory Committee of Glover’s Reef Marine Reserve.  These included Jim and Kendra who own a resort in Glover’s Reef. Living in Belize for 25 years, they have a vested interest in protecting the ecosystem of the reef for their guests and sustainability of their livelihood on this atoll.  We also had a chance to speak with Warren, another landowner who was born in Glover’s Reef and continues to be an active participant in the community. One evening, our boat captain Bok took us out to meet fishers who had just come in for the day.  Hearing their perspectives and efforts to teach the younger generations of fishers about the needs for sustainability was encouraging and inspiring.

Fisher boat

7PM – 9PM

Dinners were served to the entire group – complete with rice and beans, chicken stew, and local desserts and fruits. Again, the opportunity to engage with the stakeholders on the island over meals and card games following dinner gave us the ability to build relationships and get to know the team better.

Throughout the day

Sun and mosquito protection were essential! The island’s mosquitos were no joke, and some group members survived the mosquito bites better than others. We also learned that any walk on the island needs to be accompanied with long sleeve t-shirts, long pants, and bug spray applied to any open skin.  Wish we had bought some stock in mosquito repellent and sunscreen approved sunscreen brands!

2019 IBD Team WCS Belize

2019 IBD Team WCS Belize

As we’ve headed back to Belize City, we are looking forward to the continued learning in our 2nd week – meeting with other Marine Protected Areas to discuss best practices and exploring the best of Belize.  Look out for another update in the next week! 

 

Interview with ‘19 MBA Libby Andrada; IBD Alum and now 2019 IBD Graduate Student Instructor

Team Makerere in Kampala with the Prime Minister of Uganda

Team Makerere in Kampala with the Prime Minister of Uganda

IBD is fortunate to have former ‘18 IBD Team Lead, Libby Andrada, join this year’s IBD program as a Graduate Student Instructor (GSI).  Her role is to offer the IBD Staff and Faculty Mentors insights into the current student perspective on the IBD program. IBD interviewed Libby about her experience as an IBD student last year, as well as her role as a GSI this year.

IBD 2018 Team Makerere- Renee Medina, Luca Cosentino, Tamara Pace-Emerson, Logan Gallogly, Libby Andrada

IBD 2018 Team Makerere- Renee Medina, Luca Cosentino, Tamara Pace-Emerson, Logan Gallogly, Libby Andrada

IBD:  As a Team Lead for the Spring 2018 IBD Program with Makerere University.  Tell us a bit about the project you worked on while in Kampala?

Libby:  We worked with Makerere University and the government of Uganda to develop a strategy to grow the country’s tourism sector. Our time in Uganda was spent interviewing tourism industry stakeholders and exploring the country as tourists ourselves.

To read a blog written by Libby and her IBD Team about their experience in Uganda, click here.

IBD:  What surprised you most about what you got out of the IBD program?

Libby: What surprised me most about the IBD program was the access and responsibility our team was given. Our project was focused on growing one of Uganda’s most promising industries. We presented our final recommendations to the Prime Minister and various Ministers and members of government, including the Minister of Tourism.

IBD:  Why did you decide you wanted to return this year as a GSI for the IBD program?  

Libby:  I had such a positive experience with IBD last year and learned so much that I wanted to give back to the program. Additionally, thinking back on my experience, I thought I would have benefited from knowing more about the student experience before our time in country with the team and the client – and wanted to share my learnings and experiences with this year’s IBD class.

2018 IBD Team Makerere

2018 IBD Team Makerere

IBD: It’s early in the semester, but have you gotten what you wanted out of the experience?

Libby: My favorite part so far has been brainstorming and problem solving with the different teams. The projects are all so different and I’ve enjoyed learning about the projects and trying to provide insights or examples from my own experience where I can.

IBD: How does it feel to be on the other side now, working with the staff and Faculty on the program verses being a student in the program?

Libby:  I have so much more insight into all the behind the scenes work that takes place in order to make the program possible! I’m also realizing how, despite the differences in projects, there are a lot of learnings and experiences that can be shared across groups.

IBD: Do you have any advice for MBA students in IBD now?  How about for prospective students looking at Berkeley Haas and IBD?

IBD Big Reveal Day - 2018 IBD Team Makerere

IBD Big Reveal Day – 2018 IBD Team Makerere

Libby: For current IBD students, my advice is to enjoy it! It goes by so fast and it’s one of the most unique experiences you can have at Haas. For prospective students looking at Berkeley Haas and IBD, I’ve learned that IBD is very unique to Haas. It allows students to not only gain consulting experience, but experience working in a different country with a different culture, which is extremely valuable.

IBD: What was the most memorable thing about IBD or traveling to Kampala?

Libby: The most memorable thing was presenting to the Prime Minister and then sitting next to him at a dinner that was hosted in our honor – that was a ‘pinch myself’ moment. Our team also got to go on safaris in Queen Elizabeth National Park and Murchison Falls National Parks, which was a definite highlight.

IBD: After you graduate, what will you be doing?  Will you bring any of the skills or experiences learned in IBD to your new role?

Libby: After graduation I’ll be at Parthenon in San Francisco, so the skills I gained through IBD are very relevant! One of my biggest takeaways is the importance of expectation setting and being open and comfortable with ambiguity.

The IBD staff and Faculty Mentors are thrilled to have Libby on the team, and we look forward to her continued insights and contributions to the 2019 IBD program.  

The IBD Big Reveal for Team Members

Elinor Chang finding out she is working with Seva Foundation

Elinor Chang finding out she is working with Seva Foundation

IBD Team Members Find Out Their IBD Projects:

A significant day in the IBD spring program took place on February 14, 2019: “The Big Reveal”.  This is the day during which all IBD students (Team Leads and Team Members) come together for the first time in their IBD class.  It is also the day during which the Team Members learn for the first time the nature of their IBD projects, their clients, their teammates, and where they will travel in May for their in-country experience.

Team Dura-Line gives hugs

Team Dura-Line hugs

Video Reveal:

In continuation of a recently established IBD tradition, our sixteen student Team Leads created short videos to show during the IBD Big Reveal, introducing their respective IBD projects to the newly announced Team Members on their team. IBD Executive Director David Richardson had this to say about the event: “Each video was thoughtfully crafted, and it was so much fun to see the newly identified Team Members jumping up to greet their new Team Lead and other Team Members. There were hugs, high fives and the occasional handshakes, as some Team Members and Leads were meeting each other for the first time.” 

Team Makerere's Pat and Nick give high fives

Team Makerere’s Pat and Nick give high fives

What’s Next?

Now that the IBD student teams have come together for the first time, there is a lot of work to be done.  IBD teams will immediately arrange to meet with their global clients via video conference, beginning the process of learning about the organization and the project problem they are being asked to solve.  A great deal of teamwork, team building, and analysis of different countries and industries still needs to be done before each IBD student team can travel to their respective project destinations.

IBD 2019 MBA Students

IBD 2019 MBA Students

Clients and Destinations:

Every year, IBD is fortunate to work with phenomenal international project clients, and this year is no exception.  This year’s client organizations are diverse in size and industry, and represent a mix of for-profit, non-profit, education, and social enterprises.  Each IBD project is important to each client, and is fully expected to add a great deal of value to the organization. In fact, in one of the introduction videos to her new Team Members, the IBD Team Lead tells her new team that the work they will do for their client is “intended to scale globally and will affect every company in the corporate world.”  What an amazing opportunity this is for our MBA students!

Out of the sixteen project clients working with IBD this year, eight are returning from past IBD projects — including five who have had projects during each of the last three years.  This coming May, 80 IBD students will travel to 15 different countries during their three weeks of in-country project experience.

Hugs all around

Hugs all around

The entire IBD team at Berkeley Haas, including faculty and staff, is excited to be a part of our students’ unique and challenging project experience. We look forward to sharing more with our readers during the next three months, leading up to the IBD students’  and especially time in-country. Stay tuned; there is a lot of fun ahead! To check out more photos from the IBD Big Reveal class, click here.

 

Jon Metzler Joins the IBD Faculty Mentor Team

Jon Metzler speaking on panelIBD is excited to welcome our newest Faculty Mentor to the Spring IBD program, Jon Metzler.  Jon is a Lecturer at Berkeley Haas, where he teaches competitive advantage in technology, telecom and media markets (Strategy for the IT Firm), and international business.  He teaches MBA and undergraduate students at Berkeley Haas, and has led EWMBA students on Seminar in International Business (SIB) class trips to Japan. Jon is also associated faculty for the UC Berkeley for Center for Japanese Studies, and a faculty mentor at Berkeley SkyDeck, our local accelerator for Berkeley-affiliated startups.

When Jon is not teaching, mentoring or leading SIB class trips to Japan, he is managing the consulting firm that he founded in 2007, Blue Field Strategies.  Blue Field Strategies helps clients accelerate service innovation through market research and entry support, investment sourcing and due diligence, and market and policy advocacy.  Jon has supported new business launches in online media, print, edtech, wireless infrastructure, geolocation, events and services.

Jon is also an alumnus of Berkeley Haas, where he earned his MBA/MA-Asian Studies. He co-founded the Berkeley Asia Business Conference, now called the Bridge Conference.  

Jon can now add IBD Faculty Mentor to his extensive resume, and we are thrilled to have him on our team.  Recently we tracked down Jon to ask him some questions about himself and his career. Please check out his answers below.  

IBD:  What excites you most about being an IBD Faculty Mentor, and what would you like to get out of the experience?

Jon Metzler: “ What I enjoy most about teaching is working with students and getting to know them — how they think, what they aspire to, and then working with them to help them grow.  I also come from a client services (consulting) background and derive satisfaction from helping clients, so IBD is very aligned with both of these!”

IBD:  What skills or qualities do you hope to bring to your new role and/or offer to our IBD MBA students?

Jon and David Richardson, IBD Executive Director eating soft cream

Jon and David Richardson, IBD Executive Director eating soft cream

Jon Metzler:  “I have launch experience in print, wireless broadband, events, edtech, wireless infrastructure and innovation spaces, and have experience helping clients assess new opportunities and figure out how to go to market, or, as incumbents, how to harness a growing market.  In general, I enjoy helping new enterprises get off the ground and hope to bring this to the IBD program.”

IBD:  What brought you to Berkeley Haas, and how has your experience been teaching these last 4+ years?

Jon Metzler: First, some context.  When I was a student at Haas (MBA/MA-Asian Studies), I really enjoyed the balance of tenured and professional faculty, and with regards to the professional faculty, I always enjoyed the pragmatism of classes led by practitioners.  

Fast forward to 2014.  There were two paths that led me to teaching at Haas. First, I felt like I had value to provide to students after years working at startups and in services, particularly in the fields of tech and telecom. This is what eventually led to teaching Strategy for the Information Technology Firm. Secondly,  my Master’s thesis advisor (Steve Vogel in PoliSci) suggested that I teach on Japan. This is what led to leading SIBs on Japan in the EWMBA program, and a business in Japan class in the UGBA program.”

Jon Metzler- moderating panelIBD:  Tell us about being the Founder & President of Blue Field Strategies, and how this work relates to what you can offer to IBD students or clients?

Jon Metzler:  “I will answer this question as:  I feel that teaching and consulting feed each other — consulting allows me to deep dive into current industry issues, and teaching helps me digest and synthesize that into more broadly applicable lessons and material.“

IBD:  What do you like to do when you aren’t teaching, mentoring or working at Blue Field?

Jon Metzler: I am board chairman of a non-profit in San Francisco – the Japan Society of Northern California. It’s a 113-year-old non-profit, and I take that heritage and history seriously. It’s been fun working with the board and staff making sure a venerable institution is addressing market needs today.

I also have two children, one in sixth-grade and one in third-grade. Both are far smarter than I am. This keeps me on my toes!  And also helps me keep perspective on what’s important.

Lastly, I play – albeit not well – soccer as often as my schedule and body permit.”

The IBD team feels very fortunate to have Jon as a Faculty Mentor, and we look forward to his contributions to the upcoming 2019 IBD Spring program.  

The Annual IBD Conference Awards

This is the sixth year that the IBD staff awarded IBD teams with the best photos and blogs.  The competition is always fierce as so many amazing moments are captured by our IBD students around the world.  Here are the 2018 winners.

Best IBD 2018 Photos

Best Aesthetic Photo -Winner:  TEAM YGA

YGA- Art (1)

FTMBA’s: Daniel Mombiedro​, ​Joanne​ ​Lee​, ​Clara​ ​Jiang​, and ​Enrique​ ​San Martin Petit

Best Team Photo – Winner:  TEAM FORD

Ford-Team (1)

FTMBA’s: James Westhafer, Sandra Tamer, Joesph Akoni, John Sheffield, Alyssa Warren

Best Aesthetic Photo – Honorable Mention: TEAM SEEDLINKSeedlink-Art (1)

FTMBA’s: Paola​ ​Blanco​, ​Nanor​ ​Asadorian​, ​Ralph​ ​Boyajian​,​​ ​Conor​ ​Farese​, and ​Dean​ ​Guo

Best Team Photo – Honorable Mention: TEAM PSI

PSI Team in Masai Mara on Safari (1)

FTMBA’s: Sara Farsio, Jennifer Richard, Deitrich Davidheiser, Nick Greczyna, and Kamellia Saroop

Best IBD 2018 Blog

With so many great blogs written by our students describing a day in the life of their IBD project, it was nearly impossible to pick the best one.  This year ended in a tie between Team Ford and Team Think Beyond Plastic (TBP). Team Ford did a wonderful job of describing their project and how they spent their time in China working through the question that Ford asked them to solve.  Team TBP’s blog was notable because every team member contributed to the blog, sharing their own personal reflections and learnings from their in-country project experience.

This year IBD created a new award category called “Beyond Yourself.”  We presented this award to Team WCS because they wrote not just one, but two blogs detailing their IBD in-country experience, and at the same time created a video of their team experience of diving over 100 feet off the coast of Belize.  All five IBD team members obtained diver certification for this experience, which they memorialized by videoing themselves unveiling the UC Berkeley Cal Flag underwater. See the IBD Team Belize video here.

Best Blog Winners - Team Ford and TBP

Best Blog Winners – Team Ford and TBP

Team Ford : James Westhafer, Sandra Tamer, Joesph Akoni, John Sheffield, Alyssa Warren

Blog: Ford Shanghai – 2018 IBD

Team Think Beyond Plastic: Catherine​ ​Soler​, ​Leslie​ ​Brian​, ​Kelly​ ​Lamble​, ​Scott​ ​Peacock​ and ​Sipian​ ​Wan

Blog: How Three Weeks in the Bay Islands Changed our Perspective on Plastic

Blog: Continued Reflections on Our Plastic Use

Team Wildlife CS: Hima​ Erukulla​​, ​Andrew​ Lee​, Jerry Philip​, Srinivas Rajamani, ​ ​​Nik​ Reddy​​

Team WCS - Winners of the "Beyond Yourself Award"

Team WCS – Winners of the “Beyond Yourself Award”

Beyond Yourself:

IBD Team Belize aka Team Unbelizable – Week 1

IBD Team Belize aka Team Unbelizable – Week 2

WCS Video 

Click here to see all the photos from the IBD Conference

A Week in the Life of an IBD Team – Team Ananda

Written by Igor Borges, Stan Cataldo, Ryan Dingler, Elaine Leong, and Mila Pires, of the Ananda Development team in Thailand.

It was May 13th at 6pm and our team had just arrived in Suvarnabhumi, Bangkok’s main airport. Ryan (one of our team members) hailed us a Grab, Thailand’s Uber, and we were on our way to the hotel. In the hot and humid Thai weather, we passed two of our clients real estate developments. During our research, we found Ananda Development (our client) had a strong real estate presence in Bangkok and were already finding that to be true!

Ananda1

The next day we met Lloyd, our main employee contact and the best host we could have asked for. He introduced us to his staff and gave us a tour of the office, which looked more like a high-tech company office in the Bay Area than a real estate company.

Ananda2

Ananda3

After showing our initial research and framework to Dr. John, Ananda’s Chief Development Officer, we rebuilt our deck to dive deeper into the solutions we identified as strongest in preparation for our field research the following day. To decompress, back at the hotel we began a tradition, which continued for the full three weeks, where we would all play foosball but only Elaine would win. Then we managed to get through the intense Bangkok traffic to Beer Belly, a restaurant recommended by an employee at Ananda, where played some pool, air hockey and ping pong along with eating fried pork skin and some (very) spicy food.

Ananda4

Tuesday during the day, Lloyd and his team setup tours of three of Ananda’s real estate developments, from pre-construction to fully sold-out and transferred properties, including an amazing 4D projection for the Ashton brand (Ananda’s most luxurious sub-brand). The three developments were all different Ananda sub-brands (these brands vary by target resident income and style) which gave us a good perspective of the various types of customers Ananda attracts.

Ananda5

In the afternoon, we went to dinner with Ananda and a USC-Marshall team that was also doing a project with Ananda. It was a great opportunity to mingle and try several typical Thai dishes that our Ananda team ordered for us. This was also the point where Ryan was introduced to mango sticky rice – a true love story in the making.

Ananda6

Wednesday we spent the day incorporating our initial feedback from Dr. John and additional information and insights we gathered during our field tours into our deck before our presentation to the CEO on Thursday. We also got to participate in a Singularity University event on the development of “fake meat” delivered by a professor from Japan.

Ananda7

Thursday, was our big day to present to Ananda’s CEO, Khun Chanond Ruangkritya. Khun Chanond is a young Berkeley alum that is at the forefront of rewriting how real estate is done in Bangkok. During the meeting, he gave us the go-ahead and said we were heading in the right direction and gave us a lesson on how to be a successful but humble leader – a true Haasie! To close the day, we were invited to the presentation of USC’s project and networked with professors and other USC teams that were also in Thailand.

On Friday we visited another Ananda building to learn about their Property Management division and how they manage existing developments. Also, Ananda had a TGIF event, where we were able to hear an amazing Adele performance by one of our close Ananda contacts, who used to be a professional singer before joining Ananda.

Ananda8

After the performance, we headed to our flights to Chiang Mai (a city in the north of Thailand) where we spent the weekend visiting temples, caring for our “own” elephants at a sanctuary and driving rented motorcycles.

It was an amazing pleasure and privilege to be in this project and we hope the next classes are as lucky as we were in getting such a heartwarming, exciting and eye-opening experience as ours. Lloyd and the team were wonderful hosts, every week they planned multiple events for us to network with CEOs, academics, and Berkeley alums.

Thank you Ananda for this unique experience and for the invaluable lessons!

Seva Team Blog – 2018 IBD

Written by Jocelyn Brown, Rachel Lee, Grant Hannigan, Josue Chavarin, and Gagan Dhaliwal

May 21, 2018

It’s 110 degrees outside. Every bump of the road jostles us back and forth as we sit on stretchers in the back of the hospital ambulance. Weaving down dirt roads that look way too narrow for our vehicle, let alone two lanes of traffic, the driver uses the siren to announce our arrival, to both wandering buffalo and massive trucks filled with just-cut sugarcane. Within minutes of leaving the hospital, we are passing small farming villages. Goats, stray dogs and buffalo rest in the shade of ramshackle structures, along with villagers who stare at us as we drive by. Little fans in the back of the ambulance blow hot air in our faces, making it feel like we’re in the middle of a hot, dry sauna.

After stopping to ask directions several times, we finally locate our first interviewee. Today, Gagan and I are interviewing patients who visited Dr. Shroff’s Charity Eye Hospital in Mohammadi, India, and were told that they needed cataract surgery but haven’t come back yet to schedule it. We’re hoping to learn, through our teenage translators Srishti and Gracy, why they haven’t come back to the hospital. Every trip we take outside of the hospital walls has taught us an incredible amount about the surrounding communities and their day-to-day lives. We also usually come back exhausted and completely wiped from the Indian heat after only a few hours.

The first man we meet is prone on a cot underneath a straw hut and comes out to meet us. He’s shirtless, hunched from the waist around a wooden walking stick, and wearing thick, coke-bottle glasses. The first thing our translator tells us after introducing us is that he drinks alcohol. He doesn’t have any family members who can take him back to the hospital, and so he relies on others for transportation. Boiling in the sun, struggling to get any concrete details about why he might not want to come back to Shroff’s, we quickly decide to move on.

Our next interview is the opposite experience. We pull up to through the center of another village and step out of the ambulance. All of the houses around us seem to be made out of mud and straw. Several children seem to be the only ones who have any energy as they run around playing with each other and a stray dog. The community outreach coordinator for the hospital learns that our next patient is out working in the fields. While other members of the community go fetch him, chairs and water are suddenly precured from nowhere. We see very few women, just glimpses of their colorful garb from open doorways. As we wait for our interviewee, a small crowd of children and interested men starts to form. By the time our interviewee has arrived, a crowd has fully surrounded our little half-moon of chairs.

We’ve worked with our translators ahead of time so they know the types of questions we’re hoping to understand: how did you first hear about Shroff’s? What motivated you to seek care there? Did you understand what the doctor told you about cataract surgery? Why haven’t you returned to Shroff’s for surgery? We receive very brief answers in return: I was very satisfied with my experience. I wouldn’t change anything; the doctors and facilities are the best. Now surrounded with a full crowd of villagers, I wonder how much this man feels like sharing with these foreigners who have suddenly descended upon him and his home.

Conducting our interview with a local farmer

Conducting our interview with a local farmer

As our translators work to glean why this man hasn’t returned to the hospital for surgery (he doesn’t have the time), Gagan and I start to realize the enormity of our task. Our goal is to find untapped sources of new paying patient revenue, so that the hospital can work towards financial sustainability. But as our interviews in the community continue (we only make it through two more before we’re completely wiped by the heat), we realize we will not find the patients we’re looking for here.

We discover that the sugar cane farmers are paid 1-2 times a year for their crop and are making at most $5,000 a year. If these villagers are challenged with the basics of transportation and finding the time to make the trip to the hospital, none of our fancy, MBA pricing models are going to make any bit of difference in this community. Our impression that these patients would price shop for their surgery is immediately dispelled once we realize the simple, minimal lifestyle that describes 80% of this entire state of 200 million people. It’s only Monday of our second week and we certainly have our work cut out for us to identify sources of paying patients.

We gathered quite the crowd!

We gathered quite the crowd!

Maximum Satisfaction: The IBD Max Warehouse Experience

Written by Natalie Bauman, Vicky Ngo-Lam, Jeremy Scheier, Elana Congress, and Alex Austin

Team Max WarehouseMay 31, 2018

“Before you come, there are two very important words which you must know: guacamole y frijoles,” asserts Juan Carlos on our first weekly team call. Juan Carlos is the project lead at Max Warehouse and serves as our cheerleader and guide throughout. He is really invested in our Spanish language education. “Next week, you will learn some new words,” he assures us. Can you guess the word we learned the next week? Cerveza–por supuesto! We learned vocabulary beyond just guacamole, beer, and beans, though. We pick up “Guatamaleños” (Guatemalan slang words)  and use them incorrectly and excessively.  Our favorite is “va” (“let’s go, sure, got it!”). We figure that between us, we have 2.5 people proficient in Spanish (and also 2.5 MBAs). Our motley collection of Spanish knowledge and ability to support one another in communication attempts represents well our team dynamics.

Introducing: IBD Team “MaxWareHaas.”Team with Duracel Bunny

We are the MaxWareHaas IBD team: Natalie, Jeremy, Elana, Alex, and Vicky.  Our project is with Max Warehouse, a subsidiary of Grupo Cemaco, the fourth largest retailer in the country. Max Warehouse started in 2012 as an online wholesaler for Ace hardware products and then launched its own website, MaxWarehouse.com, in January 2017 as a way to increase profits, build brand equity, and ensure a sustainable business. Our task is to create short-term recommendations, tactics, and a 3-year roadmap for MaxWarehouse.com’s growth. As the project progressed additional questions emerged, which kept us busy and provided a perfect opportunity to leverage our MBA skills to help this enthusiastic company. Our work at Max Warehouse
While at Berkeley this spring, we completed a design thinking-style story-board about Max Warehouse as a client and their current story. It really helped us get a grasp on how we fit in and how we can help them. What we came away with is that Max Warehouse is a feisty, entrepreneurial company pushing for growth. They are in a bit of an identity crisis though,
unsure of their value proposition or ideal customer. They are tenacious and eager to succeed in the U.S. market as an ecommerce player, despite the fact that they’re Guatemala-based and competing with Amazon.

IBD presentation Our final recommendation included 5-10 short and medium term recommendations. When we came in the next day, they were already in the process of implementing the recommendations. They had started interviewing for search optimization personnel, cutting products that weigh > 50 lbs from their SKUs, figuring out how to eliminate products without complete content listings, and implementing project management and communication software to increase cross-functional knowledge sharing across the team. This just shows the client’s drive to improve, and is what has made this project so rewarding and fun.

Touring Guatemala in Style

One of the highest ROI moments of the trip occurred when Alex and Natalie Team site seeingattended Grupo Cemaco’s annual internal football tournament. 26 teams competed, consisting of Grupo Cemaco employees from the stores, warehouses, and corporate teams. The Zona 5 office team, where we work, made the championship game for the first time ever. Alex and Natalie attended the game to cheer on the team and show our support. Afterwards, they chatted with Don Mario, the patriarch of the family that founded and leads the Grupo Cemaco enterprise. They mention that the upcoming weekend agenda was a trip to Tikal to see the ancient Mayan ruins. Don Mario asked about flights, arrangement, and hotels. Alex and Natalie sheepishly admitted that nothing has yet been booked. Two hours later, we had an entire weekend itinerary: flights, a stay at a beautiful eco lodge in El Remate (near Tikal) and a luxury hotel in Antigua, a top-notch tour guide, and complete transportation. The generosity and care is unfathomable to us. We cannot even begin to express our gratitude. This is just another example of the hospitality which is woven into the fabric of the Guatemalan

Sunset in Antigua IBD

Sunset in Antigua IBD

culture.

Farewell to Guate.

As we prepare to depart from this beautiful country, return to Berkeley, and start our internships, we are grateful for our amazing experience here. In addition to the work we accomplished for the company, everything that we learned about ecommerce in the home goods segment, and how a startup nested within a corporation can find success, we have learned about this hidden gem of a place and met some of the kindest people in the world.Team in Antigua

Using Human-Centered Design to Improve Patients’ Lives

By Melea Atkins, Kathryn Balestreri, Bree Jenkins, Ben Lauing, and Hannah Levinson

There were bright pink and orange and blue post-its everywhere. It looked just like the Innovation Lab at Haas had looked weeks before as we ran through an exercise during our Problem-Finding, Problem-Solving class. But we were 6,500 miles away from Haas, many of the post-its were written in Portuguese, and the stakes were high.

The São Paulo IBD team was facilitating a three-hour rapid ideation workshop at the major pharmaceutical company Novartis, leading a group of 16 senior-level employees through the human-centered design cycle to generate ideas about why patients don’t adhere to their medication. Our fear that directions would be lost in translation given the language barrier was immediately assuaged as people openly shared personal journeys with chronic illness and others wrote down observations. One woman shared her personal experience being treated by a physician for a chronic illness. He chose not to pursue aggressive treatment because he didn’t want to impose physical pain on his patient. She was left feeling out of control over her own life, and her emotional and physical suffering only increased over time. This led to an insight around shared decision-making and that a personal physician relationship is foundational to patient engagement and medication adherence.

Sticky notes

After the workshop, we received such a thoughtful WhatsApp message (the primary mode of communication – even for Novartis professionals!): This was so great, I’ve worked here for so long but I forgot that I’ve been the patient too.

Leading this workshop was a transformational Haas experience. When facilitating, we were pushed to command a room of people who were senior to us, whose primary language was different from ours, and who had no prior exposure to design thinking tools. The workshop also strengthened the bond of our IBD team, as we all worked together to ensure the success of the experience. Our team was especially fortunate to have Kathryn Balestreri, who brought design thinking expertise from her work as an innovation consultant and through Haas at Work. 

The Novartis Brazil team collaborates in small groups

The Novartis Brazil team collaborates in small groups

This human-centered design approach landed well with the Novartis team, and we realized how well it lent itself to the overarching goal of our project: helping patients better adhere to heart failure medication. Through our research and 71 interviews with subject matter experts, physicians, startups, and heart failure patients over the course of our project, it was abundantly clear that we wouldn’t be able to identify the root cause of non-adherence to heart failure medication without truly understanding why patients behave the way they do. Thus, when it came to generating solutions for Novartis, we generated six key insights about how we might positively impact patient behavior and improve adherence, used these insights to power ideas, and ultimately converged on one idea to create a prototype and action plan for Brazil. We called the prototype “Rede Integrade de Acolhimento” (RIA), which means “smile” in Portuguese. This is a title that a Novartis employee generated during the final prototyping stage of the ideation workshop.

In our final client call, the project manager requested materials about leading human-centered design workshops, because she wanted to replicate the workshop for Novartis teams in other Latin American countries. Hearing not only that Novartis was interested in our ideas, but also that they wanted to use some of the tools that we’d brought felt like a true success.

Bree Jenkins leads our team through our own ideation workshop

Bree Jenkins leads our team through our own ideation workshop

IBD Team Makerere, Changing the Trajectory of Uganda’s Tourism Sector

Team Makerere together in front of a lakeWritten by Elizabeth Andrada, Luca Cosentino, ​Tamara Pace-Emerson, ​

Logan Gallogly, and ​Renee Medina

Changing the trajectory of Uganda’s tourism sector

Our IBD team worked with the government of Uganda and a team focused on enhancing public and private sector partnerships at Makerere University, Uganda’s largest university, to redefine the country’s tourism strategy. Many sectors have invested a lot of time and money to improve the country’s tourism sector, however, there were a few elements missing in both the strategies and execution that prevented Uganda’s tourism sector from thriving.

Making an impact with a dedicated audience

Our team had a once in a lifetime opportunity to present our final recommendations to the Prime Minister of Uganda, Governor of the Central Bank of Uganda and Minister of Tourism of Uganda, in addition to many other members of government and private sector leaders in the country. Our three weeks in country culminated in this exciting event, which was followed by a private dinner with the mentioned stakeholders (several of whom are UC Berkeley alums!) that evening. The dinner gave us an opportunity to discuss our final presentation in a less formal environment, share more details of our findings, and highlight the key resource requirements so Uganda can successfully implement our recommendations.

Our project approach

Before heading to Kampala (the country’s capital), our team conducted secondary research on the tourism industry in Uganda and studied tourism strategy for the neighboring East African countries such as Rwanda, Kenya and Tanzania. Based on the research, surveys and focus groups with classmates as well as our weekly client calls, our team developed a set of initial hypotheses related to improving the current state of tourism in Uganda.

IBD Team Makerere posingDespite our pre-work and research, we quickly discovered once we had arrived in-country that there was a lot to learn with many more nuances and local considerations to keep in mind when thinking about our final recommendations. We spent the first week conducting interviews with more than 15 stakeholders across the tourism sector, which changed our perceptions of the primary challenges facing the Uganda tourism sector. We spent the second week traveling around the country as tourists ourselves in order to understand first-hand the differentiators and challenges to a thriving tourism sector in the country.

Where we visited

Our team used Kampala, Uganda’s largest city, as our home base, but because many of the country’s key tourist sites are outside of the city, we also wanted to spend time visiting these destinations. This primary research would help inform our final recommendations related to a tourist’s experience in the country. Our team had the opportunity to visit:

  • Jinga, the source of the Nile River (where the Nile meets Lake Victoria) and to do a sunset kayaking trip on the Nile;
  • Entebbe and the Uganda Wildlife Conservation Education Centre where we got to pet cheetahs and feed lions and baby elephants;
  • Murchison Falls National Park, where we participated in a traditional safari game drive and saw giraffes, hippos, elephants, lions, bison, buffalo, birds and countless other animals as well as hike to the top of the two waterfalls in the park;
  • Lake Bunyoni, the second deepest lake in the world and the deepest lake in Africa, where we stayed at an eco-lodge and had the opportunity to boat, swim and hike; and
  • Queen Elizabeth National Park, where we participated in a second game drive and enjoyed views of the Rwenzori mountain range while having an authentic ‘Rolex’ breakfast.

IBD Team Makerere in front of body of waterOur final recommendations and project culmination

The team developed four final recommendations for our client, focusing on marketing as well as the tourist and business experience. As mentioned, we had the unique opportunity to present our findings and final recommendations to the Prime Minister as well as other government and private sector stakeholders.

Our IBD experience was a highlight of our time thus far at Haas and is one that we will never forget. Our team created a meaningful bond as we sought to provide an actionable roadmap for the country’s leaders to make it a top tourist destination. We feel so honored to have had the opportunity to make an impact and to change the trajectory of the tourism industry in Uganda. We look forward to visiting Uganda again to see the progress that has been made in implementing our recommendations.