IBD in the World

IBD Director of Development, David Richardson and Executive Director, Kristi Raube, have been traveling around the world the last couple months meeting with alumni and prospective clients to talk about the IBD program.  In fact, Kristi and Dean Lyons were all in Santiago, Chile, this past week at the spectacular venue, Los Majadas de Pirque.

Haas Alumni in Santiago at Las Majadas de Pirque

Haas Alumni in Santiago at Las Majadas de Pirque

120 Haas alumni were in attendance, including the Chilean Haas Alumni Network Chapter President, Marcello Vasquez ( ’02) and one of the owners of Los Majadas de Pirque, Pablo Bosch (’15).  Pablo is also an IBD alumnus and in 2014, he went to Haiti to work with the Haitian Education & Leadership Program (HELP), which provides scholarships to low-income, high-achieving Haitian college students.

David’s travels took him to Bogota, Sao Paulo and Buenos Aires, this past week and Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Beijing in October.  Meanwhile, Kristi has been to four continents in the last 3 months.  Her travels have taken her to Nigeria, Ghana, Sweden, Norway, Shanghai, Ecuador, Vietnam, and Chile.  All the fruits of Kristi’s and David’s travel will soon reveal themselves in January when the 16 team leads will be assigned to their projects.   We can’t wait to reveal the clients, projects and destinations in March 2017.  Stay Tuned!

Berkeley-Haas alumni dinner in Bogota

Berkeley-Haas alumni dinner in Bogota

Please enjoy photos from both of David’s travels.  To view photos from David’s trip to Latin America, click here and to view photos from his trip to Asia, click here.

Dinner in Hong Kong with Berkeley-Haas alumni James Man and Alan Cheng

Dinner in Hong Kong with Berkeley-Haas alumni James Man and Alan Cheng

Volcanoes, Desert, Snow, Graffiti, Barbeques, and Darth Vader – IBD Chile 2016

FTMBA students Claire Levy, Arun Kanuri, Vlada Alexandrov, Thato Keineetse, and Justin Savino-Sullins spent the past three weeks in Santiago, Chile working on an International Business Development (IBD) project.

Pre-Work Trips

Chile is one of the most geographically diverse countries in the world, but because it is so long, it takes a lot of time to travel to many of the most famous sites. Eager to see the country, we left Berkeley as soon as we could after finals in order to have time to explore before beginning work. A few of us flew up to San Pedro de Atacama, an amazing destination in the desert. We toured around geysers, hiked up sand dunes, swam in salt lagoons, and basked in hot springs. Atacama is the driest desert in the world (although nowhere near the warmest, which we discovered too late!) and sits on a major tectonic fault line, which accounts for some spectacular geological phenomena. We collectively took hundreds of photos of the surrounding volcanoes and spectacular sunsets.

A couple of team members drove up into the mountains around Santiago and took in the beautiful scenery of snowcapped mountains and Maípo, an active volcano. Battling jet lag and high altitude, they hiked to a waterfall and took photos of the rainbow it created.

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Working at Mediastream

We are here in Chile to work with Mediastream, a local startup that provides media streaming platforms to media companies and other firms. Through our research and conversations with our clients, we have become experts on tech terms like CDN, SVOD, OVP vs. OTT, transcoding, encoding, packaging on the fly, adaptive streaming technology, server-side ad stitching, and more. Our hosts put us up in the CEO’s office so that we could use the glass walls as whiteboards for our many charts, lists, and frameworks. It has been great to have our own space in which to discuss ideas and make decisions as a group, and there is a large Darth Vader model presiding over us to make sure we stay on task. We’ve also enjoyed the occasional visit from the CEO’s one-year-old son Max, whose smile is impossible to resist.Media_6

During our second week, our hosts threw us a barbecue lunch on the deck, featuring typical Chilean empanadas and completos, which are basically hot dogs overloaded with toppings, including guacamole. It was a great opportunity for us to chat with some of the other employees and ask some of our questions about the company culture and history. Everyone was very kind and welcoming, and we capped it off by all taking a selfie with Luis, the CEO and founder of Mediastream.

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Living in Providencia

Our office and hotel are both located in the district of Providencia in central Santiago. It’s a very well-to-do neighborhood, with beautiful tree-lined streets, fancy homes, and great dog watching opportunities. It’s been relatively easy to adjust to the culture and lifestyle here because it’s not terribly different from the States: 10 hour working days, running in the park, and takeout sushi for dinner. There are some funny smaller differences, however, like the fact that every sushi roll but one on most menus has cream cheese in it. The Chileans love their queso crema! The biggest adjustment apart from the language barrier is probably the change in seasons. It’s been stranger than expected to experience autumn for the second time in seven months, and the chill in the air and falling leaves connote Thanksgiving while our friends back home are posting photos from Memorial Day pool parties!

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Our neighborhood is in many ways non-representative of the typical way of life in Chile, so we were happy to discover a totally different world across the city and enjoyed a traditional dinner at a local restaurant on our way out of town for the weekend. As you can see in the photo, the crowds at the bus station were pretty intense!

Trip to Valparaíso

We spent our second weekend in Chile in the port city of Valparaíso, a city now known to tourists for its incredible display of colorful graffiti and excellent nightlife. We made sure to experience both, and enjoyed walking tours of the city and a night of dancing with a view of the bay.

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While we were visiting, the president of Chile was in town for an annual address, and there were protests, and even a fire. We were perfectly safe, but warnings of strikes and protests have become fairly routine during this trip, as you can see from our email history.

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One of our favorite elements of the city was the stray dog population. The city is full of beautiful, clean, well-fed dogs that roam the streets and often walked along quietly to protect us. It’s traditional to offer the dogs a snack once they’ve safely delivered you home. We were also befriended by a cat, and a sweet puppy followed us into our hotel one night when we were back in Santiago.

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Cultural Immersion

With the help of some of our Chilean Haasie friends and our Mediastream clients, we hit the town and made sure to immerse ourselves in the culture. Between language exchange meetups, balcony barbeques (three!), improve comedy, nights out dancing, museum visits, and pub crawls, we did our best to get to know the country and make some new friends. For our final presentation, we even gave ourselves new professional titles to represent our roles in the group. It was a great experience! Thanks to Mediastream and everyone who helped make it possible!

 

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We found a street dedicated to Dean Lyons!

 

Updates from IBD Chile – Team Falabella

Berkeley-Haas Full-Time MBA students Pati Silva, Cori Byrum, Carlos Olson, and Rob Kenny participated in a summer IBD project in Chile with the LATAM retailer Falabella.

As we boarded the plane in SFO having just finished a memorable first year in the Full-Time MBA program, we were excited to learn more about Chile, and specifically the retail sector there and more broadly in Latin America.

Our team was comprised of four people with varying knowledge of the region and sector (as well as Spanish language skills!). This meant that we were all very excited to experience something new.

Final preparations coincided with deadlines for group projects and final exams, which meant for a frenzied couple of weeks before we headed for Santiago. Thankfully, we had a couple of days to gather ourselves after we arrived before starting the project in earnest.

We were tasked with helping Falabella better understand the rapidly evolving digital payments space and how this will impact Latin American consumers in the coming years.

Retail is a great way to gain insight into all aspects of society, and Falabella is a strong player in the Peruvian, Argentinian, Colombian, and especially Chilean, markets with strong department stores, home improvement and food retail businesses. Experiencing these first-hand in Santiago gave us a great understanding of the similarities and differences between US/European and Chilean consumers.

Falabella also has a strong presence in the financial sector with a bank, credit card and insurance business, which capitalizes on their strong relationship with their large customer base.

Finally, and perhaps most surprising to us, Falabella successfully runs large and modern malls. The ones we visited wouldn’t have looked out of place in San Francisco or London. They were also almost universally full to bursting with consumers. It seems like visiting malls is a favorite hobby for Latin American consumers!

Overall, we all really enjoyed getting a great insight into a strong, interesting and diverse company, as well as gaining a better understanding of the Chilean consumer.

Chilean people were so welcoming and friendly (except perhaps when they were behind the wheel of a car…), and we really enjoyed their hospitality. We even managed to stumble across President Bachelet welcoming the Honduran President to Santiago.

While our project didn’t call for any travel outside of the capital, we still managed to enjoy exploring some of the surrounding areas like the wine regions around the Colchagua and Casablanca valleys and the beautiful coastal cities of Valparaíso and Viña del Mar.

Eager to start our first day at the Falabella office in Chile!

Eager to start our first day at the Falabella office in Chile!

Visiting the Chilean version of Ikea, Homy, with one of our favorite Falabella hosts, Walter.

Visiting the Chilean version of Ikea, Homy, with one of our favorite Falabella hosts, Walter.

We enjoyed visiting the Falabella department stores and observing the similarities and differences to the similar stores we have at home (like Macy’s).

We enjoyed visiting the Falabella department stores and observing the similarities and differences to the similar stores we have at home (like Macy’s).

While Chileans will admit they are not known for their cuisine, we had some delicious meals. Our favorite food item? Definitey empanadas!

While Chileans will admit they are not known for their cuisine, we had some delicious meals. Our favorite food item? Definitey empanadas!

Our wonderful classmate, Katia Glucksmann, hosted our team and visiting IBD Team Boacadio from Peru for a traditional Chilean meal.

Our wonderful classmate, Katia Glucksmann, hosted our team and visiting IBD Team Boacadio from Peru for a traditional Chilean meal.

The Santa Cruz wine producing region was very scenic and a welcome escape from the hustle and bustle of the city.

The Santa Cruz wine producing region was very scenic and a welcome escape from the hustle and bustle of the city.

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On a casual walk back from a meeting, we saw Chilean President Michelle Bachelet and a miliary presentation that marked Santiago’s welcome to Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández.

On a casual walk back from a meeting, we saw Chilean President Michelle Bachelet and a miliary presentation that marked Santiago’s welcome to Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández.

Our final presentation with the QuickPay Team! – Pablo, Alvaro, Guillermo

Our final presentation with the QuickPay Team! – Pablo, Alvaro, Guillermo

Updates from IBD Peru and Chile – Team Bocadio Part II

Part II of Spring 2015 IBD Team Bocadio’s adventures working with Bocadio, an innovative, high-quality meal delivery startup in Latin America.

3 – On Getting a Phone

As we settled into our daily routine of data analytics and market sizing, it was clear that communicating with each other, and Diego, would require finding a dataplan. It was through this adventure that Christian and Steven discovered that Inventarte’s complex check-out process was perhaps simply indicative of a cultural difference we had missed: Peruvians enjoy processes. Indeed, as it turns out, securing a phone plan required no less than 12 steps:

The Twelve Labors of Claro

  1. Find the only store in Lima where you can purchase a SIM card for your phone from Claro, one of the major operators in Latin America
  2. Revisit the store a second time, as it is closed on the weekends
  3. Line up for a ticket, and explain purpose of visit in broken Spanish
  4. Realize you need your passport and the little immigration stub to accomplish most things in Peru
  5. Return to hotel to pick up passport
  6. Rush frantically back to the store, as it closes early
  7. Line up for a ticket, realize the person at the desk has changed, and explain again the purpose of visit in broken Spanish
  8. Wait to be called to a customer service counter and get a voucher for a SIM card
  9. Line up at cash register to pay for the SIM card itself
  10. Return to customer service counter to collect SIM card
  11. Line up at automated kiosk to add initial credit to phone
  12. Return to customer service counter, to activate phone
Claro - many phones but only one place to buy a SIM

Claro – many phones but only one place to buy a SIM

In the hotel lobby, Kayo had already secured her own dataplan, and was happily browsing away when Steven and Christian, having triumphed over Claro, returned sweaty and disgusting, but with chests stuck out like proud warriors bringing back in their pockets the spoils of their war. “Actually,” Kayo said, “for me it was very fast. Japanese Guide told me everything I needed to bring.”

On the inside, Christian and Steven wept.

4 – On Our Travels Outside Lima

In Steven and Ben’s absence, Kayo and Christian opted to use their weekend alone to travel outside of the city and see some of the country’s favorite sights. While forewarned by Japanese Guide of the challenges that lay ahead of them, they embarked upon a perilous 8-hour bus and car journey to Nazca, sight of the world-famous Nazca lines. Of course, travelling around the country is much easier today that it would have been in the time of the Nazca people. Thousands of years ago, it would have taken months to get from Nazca to Lima by llama whereas today, thanks to the way people drive, you are lucky to get there at all.

Whatever they may have felt, however, Kayo and Christian had no real choice: humans are hard wired to travel. Indeed, we travel because no matter how content we are at home, we yearn take new tours, buy new souvenirs, introduce ravenous new bacteria to our intestines, learn new words for “explosive diarrhea,” and have all kinds of other unforgettable experiences that make us want to embrace our beds when we finally get home.

Of course, none of this mattered once Christian and Kayo finally found themselves on the tarmac of the Nazca Aerodrome (Motto: “The only way to fly. No really, we mean it, there is nothing for hundreds of miles.”) awaiting their turn in the back of a tiny Cessna, the preferred method of viewing the ancient lines. Thankful that the very hearty breakfast they had enjoyed that morning was helping to keep them warm in the frigid desert, Kayo and Christian listened to the pilot’s instructions as they were strapped into their seats. “Oh and I hope you skipped breakfast this morning,” he concluded, “things can get pretty bumpy.” Christian opened his mouth to make a witty remark, but before he could, the minuscule aircraft shot into the air.

Happiness...

Happiness…

...and a little bit of anxiety -- just a bit

…and a little bit of anxiety — just a bit

Meanwhile in Santiago, Steven and Ben were helping Diego add a real-world lens to his market research. The goal of the visit was to better understand the market conditions and viability for starting a Bocadio branch in Santiago, and begin building relationships with investors and local operators who could one day help grow the business.

Our first day in Santiago, a Haas alumnus, and old friend of Diego, Koichi Arimitsu, had a dinner to welcome Diego, Steven and Ben to Santiago. Koichi shared his experiences as an entrepreneur in Chile, starting one of the first large-scale solar plants in the northern desert. Koichi explained that Santiago’s start-up community is growing quickly, and is heavily supported by a strong government infrastructure. Koichi also complained about the lack of delicious food, despite the wealth of incredible, locally grown ingredients (Chile’s top exports include Wine, Salmon, Avocados, Grapes, Apples, Pears, and Pigs). As Koichi explained, “they’ve got amazing ingredients, but have no idea how to prepare them!” In fact, Chileans avoid “Chilean” cuisine at all costs. What are the two hottest restaurants in town? Peruvian exports: Gaston Acurio’s Le Mar, and Ciro Watanabe’s Osaka.

Diego, Ben, and Steven were excited to hear that the market opportunity in Santiago was prime for a new, high quality, low cost food delivery service – especially one backed Peruvian chefs that could meet the demand of a growing middle-class that lacked in-home help.

Koichi's Texas-sized portion of Pork & Asparagus

Koichi’s Texas-sized portion of Pork & Asparagus

The second day in Santiago, Steven, Ben and Diego had lined up a number of meetings with potential investors, including another solar entrepreneur (Haas ’07), a family office who was responsible for bringing Papa John’s to Chile, and the head of Fundacion Chile (Haas ’06). The first two meetings went incredibly well, each investor indicating that Bocadio would do well in Santiago, and they may be willing to contribute to help fund its expansion.

Diego discussing the Bocadio concept with Haas alum Christian Sjorgen

Diego discussing the Bocadio concept with Haas alum Christian Sjorgen

Steven, Ben and Diego were over the moon with this feedback. Hearing from real investors in the flesh of Bocadio’s market potential helped validate the months of market research they had been conducting on the ground in Berkeley. Further, they began to realize that the idolization of Peruvian cuisine and lack of local flavors was unique to Santiago, and perhaps made it a better market to begin expansion when compared to cities with similar profiles (such as Bogota).

The third day, Diego had arranged a tour of Aramark’s largest food processing facility in Santiago. This plant was responsible for cooking and delivering hundreds of thousands of meals a year to mines scattered across the north and south of Chile. The plant tour would provide Diego a window into a state-of-the-art food production facility, and the techniques required to optimize cooking food & then chilling it for delivery at scale.

Walking through the factory floor, Diego, Ben and Steven got to see first-hand the incredible technology that made this type of food production possible – including a laser-cutting machine that could quickly dice any type of meat into uniform cubes, identical in weight, and a giant skillet that could cook hundreds of pounds of spaghetti with meatballs by simply loading the ingredients. While adding to the future wish-list of equipment, Diego, Ben and Steven were also able to have an insight that could be applied immediately – adopting a bar code scanning system that could trace the origin of each meal, allowing for better insights throughout the supply chain.

Visiting Aramark's Plant

Visiting Aramark’s Plant

Ben and Steven taking advantage of the weekend in Santiago on horseback through the Andes

Ben and Steven taking advantage of the weekend in Santiago on horseback through the Andes

Showing some school spirit

Showing some school spirit

 

Updates from IBD Peru and Chile – Team Bocadio Part I

Berkeley-Haas Full-time MBA students Benjamin Geller, Steven Truong, Christian Kaas and Kayo Inoue worked with Peruvian food delivery startup “Bocadio” to launch the business in Lima, and craft a plan for expansion throughout Latin-America. Bocadio combines technology and gastronomy to provide high-quality meals delivered quickly at a low price-point. Originally our goal was to help Bocadio in its initial month of operation in Lima, while researching opportunities for international expansion. However, upon landing we realized that construction on the kitchen had been delayed. With this impetus, we refocused our project on preparing the Bocadio team for a successful Beta period when the kitchen completed in August, and investigating international expansion in Santiago, with Steven and Ben joining Diego for one week to meet with investors and operators.

1 – On Arriving in Peru

While the team left Berkeley at 4am, it was already night time when we arrived in Lima, excited to begin our IBD adventure with Bocadio, the latest addition to the city’s thriving food scene and the local analog to the Bay Area’s successful Munchery concept.

Making our way through the airport towards baggage collection, Steven saw an excellent opportunity for us to get started on one of the most important parts of our project. “Guys, we need to take a picture for our blog!” If I had even been irritated by tourists’ propensity to photograph themselves in the inane and inconvenient of settings, I can now sympathize that they must simply be collecting material for their IBD deliverable. This picture of us happily holding up foot traffic in-front of the Jorge Chavez International Airport international arrivals’ women’s lavatory can attest to this.

Arrival in Lima

Arrival in Lima

Exhausted by our trip, we were happy to have arrived a day early and to have Sunday off to discover Lima. Our first challenge was an important one, particularly given our project context: where do we eat? TripAdvisor raved about a local joint Haiti Haiti Café that was, rather interestingly, neither Haitian nor really a café. Proud of our first foray into the local culinary scene, we would later tell our client team about Haiti Haiti and how happy we were with our discovery. “This is not a good place to eat,” the team grimaced. Surprisingly, it turns out that hotdoggurl_345 from Skokie, Illinois is a poor assessor of Peruvian cuisine. Who knew?

First lunch in Peru - they love their potatoes

First lunch in Peru – they love their potatoes

Another wonderful meal - we were making a habit of this

Another wonderful meal – we were making a habit of this

While Steven and Christian put their extensive experience with the Spanish language and mime to communicate important things like “beer” or “fork,” Kayo seemed to be faring altogether better with her guidebook, sadly impenetrable for mere mortals, which we came to know affectionately as Japanese Guide.

Japanese Guide, or why Kayo always knew more than we did

Japanese Guide, or why Kayo always knew more than we did

2 – On Meeting Diego

Monday morning was our first meeting with Diego, who came to meet us at our hotel. Diego’s little yellow car shot through Lima traffic like a pinball, with team Bocadio in tow. “Don’t be afraid if I’m driving a little bit crazy, eh,” said Diego, elbowing his way across three lanes of traffic to catch a late turnoff, “it’s just the way you need to do things around here.” Some pink returned to our knuckles as we partly unclenched our grip our Diego’s car seats. Diego’s car would later feature in one of my dreams, with a rocket attached to the back, like a bright yellow Batmobile.

In record time, therefore, we found ourselves at Bocadio’s new office, nested above a little café in the upscale residential neighborhood of San Isidro. We enjoyed meeting so many of the people who – up to now – had only been names on an e-mail chain: Mauricio, Alex, Willy and Laura. Also present on our first day was Coque Ossio, one of Diego’s principal backers and owner of, we have come to suspect, pretty much every restaurant in Peru. Upon finding us setting up shop in a bakery near our hotel, Diego remarked “how do you like the Bonbonnière, it belongs to Coque, you know.” The restaurants at Lima airport? Coque. This celebrity connection greatly entertained us, of course, and Steven enjoyed introducing us everywhere we went as friends of Coque. Often, people would nod enthusiastically, either recognizing the name of one of the country’s great chefs, or thinking Steven was crazy. My money is on the latter.

Diego's yellow car

Diego’s yellow car

We then had the opportunity to sit down with Bocadio’s head chef at Coque’s restaurant across the street, and perform the arduous task of taste-testing potential items for the menu. We were struck by the vibrancy of flavors, and the different uses of potatoes in the dishes – who knew that Peru had over 3,000 varietals! We knew at this point that Bocadio had a dynamite product, which was great to experience first-hand.

Bocadio team member Mauricio helping serve up our first tasting

Bocadio team member Mauricio helping serve up our first tasting

 

Alex Riccio, one of Bocadio's main chefs, and a Munchery alum

Alex Riccio, one of Bocadio’s main chefs, and a Munchery alum

The team working hard

The team working hard

Happy campers pose with Chef Alex

Happy campers pose with Chef Alex

 

But back to Bocadio. One of our first tasks was to accompany Diego to meet Inventarte, his website production team, to review their progress and offer some suggestions for user-centric design based on our extensive experience of the one class Ben took on the subject. One of the main observations we made that day was that the check-out process for new users seemed overly complex, to the point of being potentially off-putting for new customers. In a similar vein, much of this first meeting focused on reducing the complexity of the Bocadio sales funnel, to make the ordering process as pleasant an experience as possible.

Reviewing the progress on the website

Reviewing the progress on the website

At the end of our first day, Diego dropped us off at one of Lima’s best-known Cevicherias, renowned for their modern interpretation of Peru’s ceviche, raw fish seized with lime juice. “The restaurant is great, but not in the best part of town,” Diego said. “Don’t leave this street.” Ben turned around to ask if he would like to join us “Dieg…”

But he was gone.

Like Batman.

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“I’m Batman.”

Stay tuned for part 2 of Team Bocadio’s adventures…

Developing a Distributed Solar Energy Sector in Chile

Team Chile worked with the Universidad de Chile and Fundación Chile in Santiago. Our goal was to recommend policy and financing tools to spur the development of distributed, or behind-the-meter, solar energy generation in Chile.

This past Thursday, Team Chile sat in the audience of a large auditorium watching the Chilean presidential candidates debate the future of energy in their country. Broadcast live on CNN Chile and sponsored in part by one of our clients, Fundación Chile, the fierce debate stressed the critical nature of Chile’s current energy dilemma. Chile needs more energy to fuel its continued economic growth, but the high smog levels in Santiago, foreign dependence on fossil fuels, and rising price of energy are leading Chileans to look for clean, sustainable energy sources within the country.

Our team with Marcos Kulka, the CEO of Fundacion Chile and a Haas alum, at the presidential debate on energy.

Our team with Marcos Kulka, the CEO of Fundacion Chile and a Haas alum, at the presidential debate on energy.

Luckily, Chile boasts some of the best solar radiation in the world. Major investment in large-scale solar generation in northern Chile has begun through both international solar developers as well a local start-ups such as Solar Chile, which was co-founded by Haas alum Cristian Sjogren.

Dinner with Haas alum Cristian Sjogren and his co-founder Koichi Arimitsu, who co-founded Solar Chile.

Dinner with Haas alum Cristian Sjogren and his co-founder Koichi Arimitsu, who co-founded Solar Chile.

Despite the growing solar industry, distributed solar on rooftops or in small community installations is relatively unexplored in Chile. Our team examined the existing markets for distributed solar in California and Germany, and then spent three weeks in Chile testing our hypotheses around how those models for public policy and financing tools might be applied in Chile.

In our first two weeks in Chile, we interviewed a broad web of stakeholders, including government ministries, environmentalists, educators, solar customers, bankers, retailers, entrepreneurs, and policy experts in Santiago. We traveled outside the capital city to interview potential commercial customers from the wine industry, and visited the port city of Valparaiso to listen to consumer opinions.

We visited the port town of Valparaiso to talk with potential solar customers.

We visited the port town of Valparaiso to talk with potential solar customers.

We visited a vineyard in the Maipo Valley to talk about their small solar-thermal installation.

We visited a vineyard in the Maipo Valley to talk about the winery’s solar-thermal installation.

Not only did we hear about policy and financing needs, but we also heard about the need for education and capacity building to foster distributed solar in Chile. As a result, we developed recommendations for a multi-pronged approach to educating consumers, financiers, government, and solar installers. We explored what it would mean to establish policy, financing, and education to spur a more democratic, distributed energy future for Chile using solar energy.

Team Chile worked closely with the Energy and Climate Change team at Fundación Chile as we developed our recommendations and tailored our ideas to the Chilean context. Fundación Chile’s office overlooks the city from high in the hills, and on a clear morning you can see the nearby Andes mountains covered with a fresh coat of snow. The organization is part think-tank and policy organization, and part incubator for new industries in Chile. (It is well known for fostering the salmon industry in Chile, for example.) The dual nature of Fundación Chile’s work pushed our team to think about both the macro-scale policy structures needed to foster the distributed solar market, as well as community engagement and viable business models for service providers working from the ground up.

The offices of Fundacion Chile overlooked the city and out to the Andes mountains.

The offices of Fundacion Chile overlooked the city and out to the Andes mountains.

In our final week, Team Chile presented our recommendations spanning policy, financing, education, and business models to increase the rate of solar adoption and establish a new, competitive sector for the Chilean economy. For example, new financing models such as solar leasing can be applied in Chile to reduce the upfront costs of solar systems and bundle customers to reach scale for effective financing opportunities.

Solar panels provide lighting at the local bus stop.

Solar panels provide lighting at the local bus stop.

Chile has already taken many positive steps toward fostering the distributed solar market with early policies that establish a vision for renewable energy development. To help Chile capture more of the value from its distributed solar industry and support rapid market expansion, our findings support even stronger, large-scale initiatives.

In the coming years, Fundación Chile and Universidad de Chile together will lead policy and public-sector initiatives to unlock demand and capital in Chile for distributed solar. In addition, Fundación Chile will undoubtedly incubate a solar provider for the Chilean market. As Chile turns to national elections in the fall, its foremost experts on policy and energy at Fundacion Chile and Universidad de Chile will have the opportunity to push for new ideas. We hope that our recommendations can help inform new developments in the nascent distributed solar sector, making Chile a regional leader in solar energy.

Our last day at the Fundacion Chile offices in Santiago

Our last day at the Fundacion Chile offices in Santiago

Salut Mendoza …

After a week full of activities in Buenos Aires, we reached Mendoza on Friday night. Some Malbec and Cabernet as welcome drinks at the hotel got us in the spirit for the upcoming wine country experience the next day.

Finding a good place for dinner was not so difficult, but our large group posed a challenge for most restaurants in the small but busy town. So we decided to split; later many of us experienced some of the richest pizzas and sandwiches of their lives in a road-side tent.

Next morning, after doing the “where is Raj” check, we started our long awaited winery visits. On the way, Kate and Leona provided a much needed 101 on Wine. This basic education was enough for us to act like a group of wine snobs and argue over the smell, color and texture of the different wines that were coming our way later in the day.

A beautiful sunny morning and views of the snow clad Andes kept us outside of our first winery of the day (Achaval Ferrer), for a long time. Then we saw tanks and tanks of wine followed by a wine-tasting session. The wines were so delicious that most of us could not resist taking some home.
A beautifully architected winery

Next we went to Catena winery. It would be more appropriate to call it a wine-castle or a museum; from cellar to rooftop, everything in this winery was a remarkable piece of architecture. We learned a lot about wine making, the impact of soil and climate, maybe a little more than we had anticipated. The afternoon snacks rich with delicious cheese, empanadas and wines were absolutely worth the wait.

In a somewhat comatose state, we reached our last winery of the day: Kaiken, a brilliant example of how to turn-around dying wines and make a great business from them.
Dinner in Mendoza

After a packed day and consuming plenty of wine we had a luxurious dinner waiting for us at the Club Tapiz. A place secluded from rest of the world, getting there after dark reminded of shots from a horror movie. The place had an unmatched retro look and luxury of its own class. No matter how “meaty” (as Paroma stated) dishes were in Buenos Aires, nothing could match the deliciousness of dinner at Tapiz. The group, including the faculty members, showed an exemplary camaraderie in sharing a surprise gift and supporting thoughts at the dinner for the victims of La-Boca. Later, most of us ended the night, or rather welcomed the morning, with a few moves on Latin beats in Mendoza.

After a late night, next morning we had just enough time to pack and catch breakfast before we head to airport. We still managed to squeeze in Norm’s “saving the Dolce” sprint at the last minute. Breathtaking views of Andes from the plane on a somewhat bumpy flight from Mendoza to Santiago made it a bit easier to say Adios to the beautiful wine country.

Mendoza to Santiago